But still, this one is brilliant. Find album credit information for Moanin' - Art Blakey & the Jazz Messengers, Art Blakey on AllMusic Amazing. The rest of the originals are by saxophonist Benny Golson (who was not with the Jazz Messengers for long, this being the only American album on which he is featured). ), Morrison, Nick (October 13, 2009) "Art Blakey: Jazz Messenger, Jazz Mentor", Giddins, Gary (March 7, 1974) "Bobby Timmons, 1935–1974". Grove Music Online. This has become a reference recording for my system. Art Blakey And The Jazz Messengers* ‎– Moanin' Label: Music Matters Ltd. ‎– MMBST-84003, Universal Music Special Markets ‎– B0020563-01, Blue Note ‎– ST-84003 "Moanin'" was first recorded, by Art Blakey's band the Jazz Messengers,[1] on October 30, 1958. "Come Rain or Come Shine" is the piece that commands the most attention, a highly modified, lilting arrangement where the accompanying staggered, staccato rhythms contrast the light-hearted refrains. [2] It has been recorded numerous times and has become a jazz standard. Certainly a complete and wholly satisfying album, Moanin' ranks with the very best of Blakey and what modern jazz offered in the late '50s and beyond. There are three tracks that are immortal and will always stand the test of time. Warm-Up and Dialogue Between Lee and Rudy, The Drum Thunder Suite: First Theme: Drum Thunder/Second Theme: Cry a Blue. has the most subtle of melody lines, and "Drum Thunder Suite" has Blakey's quick blasting tom-tom-based rudiments reigning on high as the horns sigh, leading to hard bop.

Moanin' includes some of the greatest music Blakey produced in the studio with arguably his very best band. "Moanin'" is a composition by Bobby Timmons, first recorded by Art Blakey's band the Jazz Messengers for the 1958 album of the same title that was released by Blue Note Records. "The Drum Thunder Suite" is a feature for Blakey, in three movements: "Drum Thunder"; "Cry a Blue Tear"; and "Harlem's Disciples". "Moanin'" has a call and response melody. Seymour, Gene (2005), in Kirchner, Bill (ed. Of course, it helps that it is an iconic release in the first place. "Are You Real?" The title selection is a pure tuneful melody stewed in a bluesy shuffle penned by pianist Bobby Timmons, while tenor saxophonist Benny Golson 's classy, slowed "Along Came Betty" and the static, militaristic "Blues March… I have not heard the non-SRX "Definitive Vinyl Reissue" of "Moanin'," but I can say that this version is extraordinary.

Among all of the "definitives" and "Tone Poet" releases in my collection, this one stands head and shoulders above the rest. The title selection is a pure tuneful melody stewed in a bluesy shuffle penned by pianist Bobby Timmons, while tenor saxophonist Benny Golson's classy, slowed "Along Came Betty" and the static, militaristic "Blues March" will always have a home in the repertoire of every student or professional jazz band. "Are You Real?" "Along Came Betty" is a more lyrical, long-lined piece, almost serving as the album's ballad. The precociously talented Lee Morgan, only 20 at the time of this date, remained with the Messengers off and on until 1965. Label: Blue Note - 7243 4 95324 2 7 • Series: RVG Edition • Format: CD Album, Remastered, Repress • Country: US • …

[5] Jon Hendricks later added lyrics,[5] and the subsequent recording by Lambert, Hendricks, and Ross made the song even more popular.[6]. Blue Note The Definitive Vinyl Reissue Series, Buy Vinyl. [3] It is played in F minor. is a propulsive 32-bar piece with a four-bar tag, featuring two-part writing for Golson and trumpeter Lee Morgan.

https://www.jazz24.org/2014/04/song-day-art-blakey-jazz-messengers-moanin There are three tracks that are immortal and will always stand the test of time.