Multiply the number of emitters by the GPH to get your total drip irrigation flow rate, if all your emitters have the same GPH rate. Few advances in irrigation technology have done more to conserve water than the invention of drip emitters. Each sprinkler head uses 6 GPM. He holds a Master's Degree in Environmental Planning and Design from the University of Georgia. Some additional hours of irrigation beyond the 37.5 hours, would be needed to compensate for irrigation inefficiencies. Using the formula for the area of a circle, the irrigation area for the plant is approximately 28 square feet -- 3.14 x 3 x 3 = 28.26. Usually, the dripping rate varies in between 2-16 LPH. Area and Distance Conversions Use this form to calculate the water application rate of drip irrigation lines (tape, tubing) given the flow rate from individual emitters, the spacing of the emitters along the drip line, and the spacing between the drip lines.. Use this form to calculate the water application rate of drip irrigation lines (tape, tubing) given the flow rate from individual emitters , a constant spacing of the emitter s along the drip line, and a constant spacing between the drip lines. The aim of this chapter is to provide an overview of the drip irrigation system components, their functions and properties. For a plant requiring 1.5 inches per week over an area of 28 square feet, the system would have to be programmed to supply water 26 hours per week if a single 1-gallon-per-hour emitter was used on the plant, or 13 hours if a 2-gallon-per-hour emitter was used. Structure of the drip irrigation system System head Site Information The rows are 30 feet apart and the sprinklers are 25 feet apart in the row. Use a value between 0.60 and 0.75 for sprinkler irrigation and between 0.40 and 0.50 for furrow irrigation. The following formulas assume 55% pump efficiency (the standard assumption). | sbnum=7149 | pagenum=247, Solutions to existing clogging problems (III), System evaluation for emission device clogging (IV), Surface Drip Tubing Distribution Uniformity Measures (IV-15), Calculation of drip application rate gph & in/hr (IV-16), Microsprinkler Evaluation Example (IV-16B), Calculation of Microsprinkler Distribution Uniformity (IV-15B), © 2020 Regents of the University of California, Division of Agriculture and Natural Resources, Average of low quarter emitter discharge rates. Water Pressure Conversions All rights reserved. The GPH depends on the size of the built in emitter, Hunter manufactures .4, .6 or 1.0 GPH (1.35, 2.35, 3.75 l/hr) emitters in HDL. If seven 2-gallon-per-hour emitters were spread throughout the root zone, the system would need to be on for two hours per week -- 28 / (7 x 2) = 2. Calculation of drip application rate (gph & in/hr) Determining the average discharge rate Drip emitters were sampled in a vineyard system designed with two 0.5 gph drip emitters per vine and the vines planted on a 7 foot x 11 foot spacing. A 1/2-gallon-per-hour emitter should emit 15 to 16 milliliters in 30 seconds; a 1-gallon-per-hour should emit about 31 milliliters; and a 2-gallon-per-hour emitter should emit 62 milliliters. Precipitation rate result will be in inches per hour. Get PDF Reader For example, if 40 emitters were measured, you would rank them lowest to highest, and then average the discharges of the 10 emitters with the lowest discharge rates. Measure the area of the root zone for each plant that needs to be irrigated.

For the example calculation below, we assume a drip irrigation efficiency of 90 percent.

Using the formula for the area of a circle, the irrigation area for the plant is approximately 28 square feet -- 3.14 x 3 x 3 = 28.26. To determine the average discharge rate, add the sampled emitter discharges rates together (column 4 of table) and divide the sum by the number of  emitters sampled (36 in this case). Note: Horsepower is Brake horse power for an electric motor. The emitter discharge information from the system evaluation, while valuable, must be converted to an application rate before it can be used for irrigation scheduling (that is, when and how much to irrigate).In the example we have been using, there are two drip emitters per vine (vine spacing 7 feet x 11 feet), so the average application rate is two times the emitters’ Average Discharge Rate (i.e., 2 x 0.48 gph). Example Calculation of Water Use

Do not use for fuel-powered pump engines! Nondiscrimination Statement, Accessibility If you do not know your system's efficiency, adding an additional 10 to 15% to the irrigation time would be a good place to start for a well-designed system.

Since a drip system will generally be used to water many different plants simultaneously, it is best to set the length of time the system will be on each week and then work backwards to determine number and type of emitters for each plant. Contact a local cooperative extension service office for information on the inches of water needed per week by different plants in order to calculate the gallons per hour.

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Drip emitters were sampled in a vineyard system designed with two 0.5 gph drip emitters per vine and the vines planted on a 7 foot x 11 foot spacing. These are the small plastic devices that regulate the flow of water in a drip irrigation system to ensure that each plant gets the perfect amount of water. Each sprinkler head uses 6 GPM. Copyright © Jess Stryker, 1997-2018. Remember to use the actual emitter outputs when calculating the number of emitters and hours of irrigation per week. However, it is better to evenly distribute several emitters throughout the root zone of the plant. Place a graduated cylinder under an emitter and collect the water for 30 seconds. The rows are 30 feet apart and the sprinklers are 25 feet apart in the row. ), you can use the average application rate to determine how many hours you will need to irrigate. Record the number of milliliters and repeat the process with a sampling of the other emitters. In this example, we would determine how many hours of irrigation, at a rate of 0.96 gph per vine, would be required to replace the calculated vine water use (in gallons per vine per time period).For example, with a vine water use of 36 gallons per vine per week, 37.5 hours of irrigation time (36 gallons ÷ 0.96 gal/hr = 37.5 hours) would be required during the week to replace the 36 gallons of vine water use. A drip irrigation system comprises many components, each one of them playing an important part in the operation of the system. Thirty-six drip emitters were sampled by measuring the water discharged from each emitter for a 30-second period.

U.S. To Metric Conversions hd. The actual rate of flow depends on the water pressure in the system, so it is best to see if the emitters are putting out the intended amount or not. That would be the average of the low-quarter emitter discharge rate.To determine distribution uniformity from the data shown in the following table you must determine (1) the average of all the emitter discharges measured (already determined above to be 0.48 gph), and (2) the average of the low-quarter discharge rate – in this case the average of the 9 (36 ÷ 4 = 9) lowest discharge rate values.It is possible to hand rank each of the measured emitter discharge rates, from lowest to highest (results shown in column 5 of the table), but this would be very time consuming. For more information on irrigation uniformity, click on  What is an acceptable DU? GPM of water source/GPM of Drip tape X 100ft 100 GPM/3.0 = 33.3 33.3 X 100ft = 3,330ft Pump can handle 3,330ft of drip tape 22 lines, 150ft long Gallons Per minute / gpm per 100ft = number of 100 ft lengths Step 3: Design Your System (Calculate how much drip you can water at one time) Emitter Flowrate: Drip emitters are designed to work at specific flowrate. (GPM of full circle sprinkler x 96.3) / head spacing in feet = precipitation rate, (GPM of full circle sprinkler x 96.3) / (head spacing in feet x 0.866) = precipitation rate. Calculate the application rate of each similar zone by using the following formula: 231 is going to be the conversion number or constant. Summing the 36 discharge rate values in column 4 of the table and dividing by 36 gives an average discharge rate of 0.48 gph.