Haghartsin Monastery, Dilijan. Located in the Tavush Province of Northern Armenia, this 13th century marvel is one of the must see attractions to experience.

In 2017 the monastery was incorporated into the Transcaucasian Trail long-distance hiking route. Among the memorial khachkars of Haghartsin and Goshavank there are unique and highly artistic ones. The caretaker lives in a small house with his family down a short path from the monastery, you must get him to open the doors if he is not there. The size, proportions, detail, carvings, etc all seem perfect. Haghartsin Monastery in the snow The refectory of Haghardzin, built by the architect Minas in 1248, is a structure of a rare composition. The platband of the southern portal's architrave is framed with rows of trefoils. Very few people were around which was both sad and nice. Haghartsin Monastery is located in Tavush Province of Armenia (historical Dzoropor canton of Gugark Province) 18 km far from Dilijan town in the picturesque gorge of upper reaches of Haghartsin River. It was built between the 10th and 13th centuries (in the 12th under Khachatur of Taron); much of it under the patronage of the Bagrationi Dynasty. A few of us made it out to that building and looking down at the great drop over which we had to jump once or twice made our way to the opposite side where we were treated with a truly glorious view of the entire monastery complex nestled on the mountain. The most important restorations were conducted in 1671 and in 1681 by Armenians from Tbilisi. They will be cursed by the Holy Virgin Mary of Vardzia and by the 318 holy Fathers of church. ka:აღარცინი

The monastery of Haghartsin, together with that of Goshavank, may become part of a natural site based on the state protected area of Dilijan National Park, an important forest in north-eastern Armenia. Reaching "Haghartsin Monastery" is already an amazing part of its visit! After lunch we set off to explore. The transition from the rectangle of their base to the octagon of the top is decorated with tre- and quatrefoils.

Located at "Dilijan National Park", "Haghartsin Monastery" is surrounded by beautiful forests on a mountainside.

It was built on the command of the Bagratuni royal dinasty back in the 10th century.

The remains of burial vault of two kings – Smbat and Gagik Kyurikians – preserved near the south wall of Surb Grigor church. [1], In 2011, Haghartsin Monastery underwent major renovation by Armenia Fund with a donation from HH Dr. Sheikh Sultan bin Muhammad Al-Qasimi, Ruler of Sharjah. The finely carved lacy ornaments are arranged in layers in which the basic elements of the composition — a cross on a shield-shaped rosette and eight-pointed Starr flling the corners of the middle-cross section—show clearly.

Live from the USSR.

There may also once have been wooden tables.

The sculptural group of the church's eastern facade differs in composition from the similar bas-reliefs of Sanahin, Haghpat, and Harich.

The framing of the central window of Haghardzin’s vestry is cross-shaped.

And the King orders to feast the Divine Liturgy for him on the day of the celebration of the Holy Cross. The Courtauld Institute of Art, Somerset House, Strand, London, WC2R 0RN, UK. [1], Currently Haghartsin Monastery is undergoing major renovation by Armenia Fund with the donation from HH Dr. Sheikh Sultan bin Mohamed Al-Qasimi, Ruler of Sharjah.

The refectory is divided by piers into two square bays covered with intersecting arches and ribbed vaults.

St. Astvatsatsin Church in Haghardzin (1281) deserves special mention. In 2 km from the monastery there are ruins of ancient Haghartsin village after which the monastery was named. Decorated with various rosettes, these sections contain sculptures of human figures in monks' attires, carrying crosses, staffs, and birds. Haghartsin (Armenian: Հաղարծին) is a 13th-century monastery located near the town of Dilijan in the Tavush Province of Armenia. Today this space has large wooden log tables and chairs, and is where receptions take place after marriages or baptisms at the monastery.

St. Astvatsatsin Church in Haghardzin (1281) is the largest building and the dominant artistic feature. There are four side chapels in each corner.

The local terrain and scenery determined the compositional peculiarities of these ensembles. Haghartsin monastery is nestled in a temperate rainforest on a mountainside.

The refectory of the monastery built by architect Minas in 1248 is one of the best examples of Armenian medieval architecture. Of interest is the ornamental carving of a thirteenth-century khachkar placed next to the southern door of St. Astvatsatsin church in Haghardzin.

Haghartsin Monastery is located in Tavush Province of Armenia (historical Dzoropor canton of Gugark Province) 18 km far from Dilijan town in the picturesque gorge of upper reaches of Haghartsin River. The donor was an individual named Kutas; the architect was called Minas.

It`s a diminutive copy of the main church. There are chapels (mostly ruined) and khachkars around the monastery.

The most important part of the building was the east section, where the abbot and special guests would have been seated.

The umbrella roofing of the model’s dome shows the original look of the dome of Astvatsatsin church.

The combination of natural and architectural beauty is very impressive, and most visitors to Armenia do not ever see it. There are also several shrines on the cliffs in the area of ​​the monastery which date back to the 5th-7th centuries. Not far from the refectory there are ruins of monastic kitchen.

The transition from the rectangle of their base to the octagon of the top is decorated with tre- and quatrefoils. Then we backtracked to see the little cave like building by the road, which is just back up the road where you came from.. A bit further down the side of the mountain and further from the church there was an incomplete three story building that had been abandoned. Presumably, one of the monks is Hovhannes Dopian, the abbot of the monastery; the other may be the abbot’s assistant who also took part in the reconstruction works. It is built of yellowish-white porous stone, which is visible on the lower part of the building. (previous page) () The refectory of Haghartsin monastery was built by the talented architect Minas with the participation of architects Movses and Grigores in 1248. The church is crowned with a dome resting upon octahedral drum.

The low abutments determine the size of the upstretched arches. The platband of the southern portal is framed with rows of trefoils, arranged in depth, which give it a picturesque look.

This type of church was very popular in medieval Armenian architecture, and can also be found in monuments in Serbia, Bulgaria, Georgia, and Cyprus.

Haghartsin Monastery complex which was founded by Bagratunies, in the 10th century is located in Dilijan town, Tavush Region. Most of the complex was built under the patronage of the Bagratuni Dynasty (9th - 11th centuries AD) during the time of the medieval Kingdom of Armenia. About the Haghartsin Monastery Complex Haghartsin Monastery is comprised of three different churches, a sepulchre, and a refectory.

It was built between the 10th and 14th century (in the 12th under Khachatur of Taron); much of it under the patronage of the Bagratuni Dynasty. The masonry technique of large ashlar blocks is an integral part of the refectory’s architectural design.

The proportionally diminishing architectural shapes create the impression of airiness and space. © 2004 Raffi Kojian, All Rights Reserved

It was built between the 10th and 14th century (in the 12th under Khachatur of Taron); much of it under the patronage of the Bagratuni Dynasty. This is the biggest building of all, the artistic dominant of the ensemble. For the village, see, Ancient, medieval, and historical Armenian churches and monasteries, Armenia Fund Will Upgrade Haghartsin Monastery With Donation from HH the Ruler of Sharjah, Transcaucasian Trail Hiking Guide: Dilijan National Park, https://en.wikipedia.org/w/index.php?title=Haghartsin_Monastery&oldid=969069932, Religious buildings and structures completed in 1244, Religious buildings and structures completed in 1248, Religious buildings and structures completed in 1281, Christian monasteries established in the 13th century, Oriental Orthodox congregations established in the 13th century, Buildings and structures in Tavush Province, Articles containing Armenian-language text, Creative Commons Attribution-ShareAlike License, This page was last edited on 23 July 2020, at 06:26.