Oxford University Press. Tutors will be looking for evidence of students' academic potential, as well as their commitment and motivation for their course, so will certainly be looking for evidence that a student has really engaged with their subject, and has a passion for studying it.

Every term we will release a new list of six books that our tutors and academics would like to share with you. At present we do not produce a specific Religion and Oriental Studies reading list for people who are considering making an application, though we always advise prospective candidates to read beyond what they are reading in school and to explore areas that interest them. If you are interested in Classical Archaeology and Ancient History, this will include the historical and archaeological evidence through which we learn about that world.

4 0 obj There is no set text and students should read widely around the subject. You may also wish to explore some websites which have excellent links to materials about the ancient world, such as the British Museum or the BBC Radio 4 archives, for example for the programme ‘In Our Time’, covering material from Ancient Greece and Ancient Rome. You of also find reading lists on the individual pages for the following languages: We always recommend that students read widely around their subject, deepening their knowledge and understanding, to help prepare for their application.

Biochemistry is the use of molecular methods to investigate, explain and manipulate biological processes. Please see the guidance on the FAQs section of the Modern Languages faculty website under the heading 'How best to prepare for the entrance procedure' for the Modern Languages element of this course. “Foundation maths” (2006) A. Croft and R. Davison, pub. You may like to look at the books which are being reviewed in the quality press. Introductory reading for prospective applicants to Computer Science can be found on the departmental website. The best way to prepare for a History degree is to read the history books which interest you, either related to your school work or ranging beyond it – and be prepared to discuss your views of those books and their arguments.

Here are some online resources you may like to use to test your knowledge: Please see the guidance on the FAQs section of the Modern Languages faculty website under the heading 'How can I prepare myself for the entrance procedure?'. �Z�U}�Z'@ �xa�&>��\t&)�����̵_ v���KX�^�'{���(� P�s64aי���u`���Q$�ݴ�A��v�rR�U�3�ەy;��k �B � ��L�(��ִ���V�F�'����9�/�m{ �m�z=�~�!�� ��i`�I��-��Ѓ1E������e�Y��B��h��� T�-��Q8���W�4���s�c H��`�����G2�w�Z��ܲ�?�α�?T$q��[���Bq �� �pm(Y�!�OҴ��(A�~��s�[϶�Y=�8�k�(e�` !_d��>Ur"�����Kf��7d�ii ��+���o]�J��'�� ]$y�%�q\4�,�~�����wA�O��;V��0YZ]v�h�ԙ�>vd�%DZ#�2I��u�gC�q~�K !y4λ�����*=�|�b��� Scientific periodicals that are valuable to study include New Scientist for short articles and Scientific American. Other recommendation are the Guardian's law pages and the Counsel magazine. For the ancient world, you may also wish to explore websites which have excellent links to historical materials, such as the British Museum or Oxford’s own Ashmolean Museum, the BBC Radio 4 archives, for example for the programme ‘In Our Time', covering material from Ancient Greece and Ancient Rome. Introductory reading for prospective applicants to Materials Science can be found on the departmental website. You can also find reading lists on the individual pages of the following languages: Suggested reading for Oriental Studies can be found on the Oriental Studies website by following the relevant links below: Introductory reading for prospective applicants to Computer Science can be found on the departmental website. We recommend that you start by reading the court reports in broad sheet newspapers. You may also wish to explore some websites which have excellent links to materials about the ancient world, such as the British Museum or the BBC Radio 4 archives, for example for the programme ‘In Our Time’, covering material from Ancient Greece and Ancient Rome. There are also many social media sites which you can join such as Classics Confidential, Classics Outreach and Classics International. Biochemistry, Molecular and Cellular. You may like to look at the books which are being reviewed in the quality press. 2020: Biochemistry Preparatory Work. There are also web resources available at the Association for Science Education (ASE) web site (link below). 2020: Tutorial Plan. At present we do not produce a specific Theology reading list for people who are considering making an application, though we always advise prospective candidates to read beyond what they are reading in school and to explore areas that interest them. We also recommend maths preparation. Useful books to prepare for the start of the Oxford biochemistry course: These are very highly recommended for students who are daunted by the maths and organic chemistry components of the course to look at in advance, but would be useful for everyone. Politics’. You may also find it interesting to explore the following resources: Introductory reading lists can be found on the Institute of Human Sciences website. Please see the guidance on the FAQs section of the Modern Languages faculty website under the heading 'How best to prepare for the entrance procedure'. Freeman. You can find the recommended reading list for Biochemistry here. Politics is a very wide-ranging subject. Begg, Fischer and Dornbusch’s ‘Economics’ is one of the introductory textbooks widely used at Oxford.